Author: Diana Kenney

MBL friendly octopus eggs are hatching!

By Raleigh McElvery It may come as a surprise that an octopus could be the next “lab rat.” MBL research fellow Eric Edsinger is developing Octopus laqueus — also called the “friendly octopus” because it is less cannibalistic than other octopus species — as a possible genetic model for cephalopods. This requires culturing multiple generations

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On regeneration: new video features Alejandro Sánchez-Alvarado | iBiology

On regeneration: new video features Alejandro Sánchez-Alvarado | iBiology

iBiology, which produces free video seminars of leading scientists presenting their research, knows where to find both rising stars and established icons of biology: in Woods Hole. Every summer, iBiology sets up a temporary film studio in the MBL’s Lillie Building to record new seminars that draw from the extraordinarily rich MBL scientific community. iBiology’s

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MBL, UChicago scientists attend launch of National Microbiome Initiative

On May 13, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy announced the National Microbiome Initiative (NMI) to foster the integrated study of microbiomes across different ecosystems. In attendance at the launch in Washington, D.C., were (left to right) David Mark Welch, director of the Marine Biological Laboratory’s Bay Paul Center and associate director

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The Secret History of Bioluminescence | Hakai Magazine

The Secret History of Bioluminescence | Hakai Magazine

By Ferris Jabr In the late 1990s, marine biologist Steven Haddock paid a visit to fellow scientist Osamu Shimomura at his laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. The two researchers shared an obsession with bioluminescence: light produced by chemical reactions in the bodies of living things—most famously the firefly, but also in fungi and a multitude

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MBL community members elected to National Academy of Sciences

The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) has elected 84 new members, including several from the Marine Biological Laboratory community, in recognition of their “distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.” The new NAS members with MBL ties are: Helen Blau, Stanford University (Invertebrate Zoology alumnus), John C. Boothroyd, Stanford University (former Biology of Parasitism course

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First squid catch of the season | @mblwoodshole

These Loligo squid are vacationing in our Marine Resources Center after our collecting vessel, R/V Gemma, brought them in from sea yesterday morning. #BiologicalDiscovery #WoodsHole A video posted by MBL Communications (@mblwoodshole) on May 3, 2016 at 12:57pm PDT

MBL Society Member Thoru Pederson honored and “revealed” by American Society for Cell Biology

One of the past decade’s mysteries in the field of cell biology has been, “Who is ‘Labby,’ the beloved and popular career advice columnist in the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) Newsletter?” At the society’s annual meeting last month, the mystery was solved as Thoru Pederson of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, a

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Your Mouth is Full of Bacteria Blooming. And it’s Beautiful | STAT News

Your Mouth is Full of Bacteria Blooming. And it's Beautiful |  STAT News

Spectacular images of microbial community structures in the human mouth by MBL’s Jessica Mark Welch are featured in this video produced by STAT News. Mark Welch collaborates with Gary Borisy of the Forsyth Institute to develop innovative ways to visualize microbial populations. See video and article here … .content-header SMBMBImages fo I Source: Your mouth

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Modern Research Might Redeem a Century-Old Theory: Our Arms and Legs Started as Gills | The Washington Post

Modern Research Might Redeem a Century-Old Theory: Our Arms and Legs Started as Gills | The Washington Post

By Sarah Kaplan In the 1870s, a German anatomist named Karl Gegenbaur had an idea. The gill arches of certain fish (gill arches are bony structures that support — you got it — the gills) had appendages that seemed to branch out like fingers. Perhaps, Gegenbaur theorized, these arches were the evolutionary precursor to fish fins and land-dwellers’ limbs. It

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